Lot 257

London 2023

1960 Aston Martin DB4 Series II

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£300,000 - £350,000 GBP | Not Sold

United Kingdom Flag | London, United Kingdom

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Chassis No.
DB4/303R
Engine No.
370/303R
Documents
UK V5
  • Benefits from just over 40 years of previous single family ownership
  • A UK example from new; retains its original engine
  • Exceptional history file, including early MoT certificates and its original buff logbook
  • Fully restored with completion in 2015; well-preserved since
  • Desirable second-series DB4
Please note if this vehicle is exported outside of the UK an export license will be required.

Built by Aston Martin from 1958-1963, the DB4 was one of the company’s most significant vehicles. Propelling the firm into the modern era, the elegant model was quintessentially British, and an Aston Martin through and through. It was clothed in stunning coachwork designed by Carrozzeria Touring of Milan, beneath which lay a 3.7-litre inline six-cylinder engine with double overhead cams and twin SU carburettors, capable of producing 240 brake-horsepower, all kept in check by four-wheel disc brakes.

Today, the DB4 can be divided into five distinct series of production, thanks to numerous rolling changes that were made by Aston Martin to the model over the course of its lifespan. The example featured here, bearing chassis number DB4/303/R, is an early second-series car. The second series variant was first introduced n January 1960 and offered significant, yet subtle improvements over the first series cars, many gleaned form early owner’s experiences with their new DB4s. The easiest way to identify a Series II car is by its open rear quarter lights, made with flat glass rather than curved, as well as a front-hinged bonnet. In addition to this, the car’s oil sump was increased from 14 to 17 pints and the oil pump was uprated. Only 349 Series II DB4s were built before the third series DB4 entered production.

First registered on 20 May 1960, as per its original buff logbook, this particular DB4 was registered “TKY 750” (the registration number it still wears today) to Alfresco Garage in Bredford. Originally finished in Wedgewood Blue over Off White interior trim, its build sheet also chronicles its early service history, showing the car having some enigne work done in April 1960 at 1,114 miles. Further work mentioned on the build sheet included replacement of the rear axle in March 1961 at 5,426 miles, and a service carried out in July 1962 at 15,506 miles.

The original logbook continues to chronicle the DB4’s early ownership history. Remaining mainly in the north of England, it was purchased in May 1964 by Peter Brewer. Brewer was active in racing old grand prix cars and allegedly used this DB4 to tow his racing cars to various historic meetings. Passing through one subsequent owner in Cheshire, the car was acquired by John Nicol in November of 1965 and would remain in the family’s from his passing in 1986 until 2006. The car’s history file contains numerous MoTs from its time with Nicol and his family, accruing some 14,000 miles over 40 years while in their care.

The DB4 was subject to a full restoration with completion in 2015. The car was fully dismanted prior to being completely restored to factory specification, which included a full engine rebuild and a bare-metal repaint in the original Wedgewood Blue. Invoices on file show the work was done by Peter Chambers Auto of Tewkesbury, with numerous parts sourced from Aston Martin Dorset and paintwork done by XK Engineering Limited of Coventry.

Purchased by the consignor following the completion of the restoration, the car has been well-preserved since and presents beautifully. Further invoices on file from Aston Martin specialist Nicholas Mee show that the suspension was rebuilt in 2018 alongside tuning the carburetors to ensure consistent performance.

A stunning and beautifully specified example of one of Britain’s best-loved grand tourers, this charming Aston Martin DB4 would cut a dash whether in the Goodwood Revival’s Pre-66 car park, or simply sitting outside your village pub.