Lot 399

1957 Jaguar Mark VIII

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$24,750 USD | Sold

United States | Hershey, Pennsylvania

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Chassis No.
780434 BW
Cylinder Head No.
N 7101-8
Documents
US Title
  • Well-preserved Jaguar sport saloon in quintessential period colors
  • Powered by Jaguar’s iconic 3.4-liter inline six-cylinder XK engine rated at 190 hp
  • Presented in black over red leather interior
  • Equipped with fold-down rear trays, pushbutton radio, and burled wood trim
  • Accompanied by factory tool roll, spare tire, and Jaguar Daimler Heritage Trust Certificate

Winner of countless races, including the 24 Hours of Le Mans a stunning seven times, Jaguar’s design and engineering prowess is renowned. Its line of luxury saloons however, whose sales helped finance the marque’s racing dominance, often remain off the radar for all but the most discerning enthusiasts. Sporting saloon cars were the preferred focus of Jaguar founder, Sir William Lyons. Throughout World War II, he and his engineers worked to design a new engine to power his vision. The first iteration of the XK engine was finished in 1948. To showcase his revolutionary double overhead camshaft, inline, six-cylinder engine, Lyons cloaked it in a supposedly one-off concept sports car, the XK120.

While 1948 is remembered for the XK120, the year also saw the debut of a new line of elegant saloons, the Jaguar Mark V. While the line initially sported Jaguar’s pre-war pushrod engine, the debut of the Mark VII in 1951 saw the race-proven XK engine’s become standard equipment. In 1956, the line improved further with the Mark VIII. While visually similar to its predecessor, the car offered new details such as a curved one-piece windshield and contoured waistline trim leading to cutback rear wheel spats. A retooled cylinder head featuring valves from the C-Type racecar enabled the Mark VIII to produce a claimed 190 horsepower and top speed north of 100 mph.

Presented for sale here is one of these unique sporting saloons. Said to be in mostly survivor condition, the car is offered in the excellent period colors of black over a patinaed red leather interior. Swathes of burled wood trim accentuate Jaguar’s classic black gauges, pushbutton radio, and folding rear tray tables. A factory tool roll, spare tire, and Jaguar Daimler Heritage Trust Certificate accompany the sale.

Well-preserved and well-appointed, this attractive cat is a sterling example of the best of what Jaguar offers: supreme elegance with sporting performance.