Lot 339

1952 Ford 8N Funk Conversion Tractor

{{lr.item.text}}

$23,100 USD | Sold

United States | Hershey, Pennsylvania

{{internetCurrentBid}}

{{internetTimeLeft}}


language
Chassis No.
8N4024
Engine No.
2517-T3CL
Funk Conversion Kit No.
5041
Documents
Bill of Sale Only
  • Features a rare and highly desirable Funk OHV six-cylinder conversion kit
  • One of only seven known surviving examples listed in the Funk Registry
  • Also equipped with Sherman dual-range transmission, auxiliary fuel tank, and Cyclone air pre-cleaner
  • Restored in correct colors and recently fitted with new grille, steering wheel, fenders, front wheels, tires, and battery
  • The ultimate Ford tractor for collectors; an unusual showpiece

With over half a million produced and sold from 1947 through 1952, the Ford 8N is unquestionably one of the most successful American tractors ever designed. In true Ford Motor Company fashion, simplicity was one of the model’s attributes: This was a small, affordable, and hardy agriculture machine built around a 120-cubic-inch inline-four motor that produced just 27 horsepower.

Naturally, some owners wanted a bit more out of their 8N, leading to a thriving upgrade and aftermarket industry. Among the most intriguing suppliers of the era was the Funk Aircraft Company of Coffeyville, Kansas. Funk built a series of conversion kits for the 8N that exchanged the stock inline-four for a flathead inline-six, a flathead V-8, or a Ford industrial overhead-valve 215-cubic-inch inline-six. This final kit, by far the rarest of the three, substantially improved output to 96 horsepower.

While production numbers are uncertain, the example offered here is one of only seven known OHV survivors listed on the Funk Registry maintained by John Dix. As this nicely restored tractor demonstrates, a Funk conversion was more than a simple engine swap. Mounting the larger engine required the use of special Funk-fabricated components, as well as modifications to the exhaust and radiator/cooling system. Further, these upgraded tractors received a revised hood, making them instantly recognizable in a field of stock 8Ns.

Although Funk kits were available for home conversion by DIY-minded tractor owners, the prevalence of AN-prefixed Funk parts throughout this 8N indicate that it was likely converted at the Coffeyville plant prior to delivery to its first owner. Additional noteworthy features found on this example include the Sherman dual-range transmission (which added both step-up and step-down gearing to give the 8N a total of 12 forward and three reverse speeds) as well as an auxiliary fuel tank and a Cyclone air pre-cleaner.

In a testament to the model’s usability and durability, many 8N tractors have survived to the present. A surprising number continue to serve faithfully on small homesteads nationwide; others have been restored and now enjoy second careers on the show circuit. Restored in its correct colors of gray and red, and sporting a new grille, fenders, steering wheel front wheels, and new tires and battery, as well as Funk decals in their correct hood and fender placements, this 8N OHV Funk conversion is a rare opportunity for a dedicated collector—and it is sure to be a standout at any tractor exhibition.