Lot 168

1931 Chrysler CG Imperial Dual-Cowl Phaeton in the style of LeBaron

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$207,200 USD | Sold

United States | Amelia Island, Florida

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Serial No.
7803128
Engine No.
CG 3545
Body No.
147-38
Documents
US Title
  • Offered from a private collection
  • Older restoration in attractive condition
  • Extremely well-detailed coachwork
  • Classic Car Club of America (CCCA) Full Classic
Please note that this lot is titled as a 1932.

By 1931, Chrysler’s Imperial had matured from simply an upmarket version of the company’s middle-range models into a fully unique and special automobile all its own. It was graced with exceptionally beautiful styling, inspired by the Cord L-29, and enabled by a magnificent 145-inch-wheelbase chassis, carrying a smooth and powerful 125-horsepower straight-eight. The Imperial was significant among its brethren by being not just large and potent, but also a superb driver, with advanced steering geometry that made it remarkably easy and comfortable to handle. In many ways it was one of the few genuine American “driver’s cars” of its time.

Among the most beautiful of the CG Imperials was the dual-cowl phaeton, styled by Ralph Roberts and built under the imprint of LeBaron, with aviation-inspired touches such as leather upholstery that wrapped over the cowl and doors. Just 85 examples were originally produced. Such is the fame of this design that it was one of several inspirations for the Classic Car Club of America’s instantly recognizable logo.

The dual-cowl phaeton shown here was acquired by the consignor over 20 years ago from the noted Imperial collector, Ed Perkins of Connecticut. Mr. Perkins had completed its restoration using painstakingly crafted new coachwork on an original CG Imperial chassis and engine sourced from two different sedans, per the records of Imperial historian Joe Morgan. The restoration is superbly detailed, with great attention to correctness and authenticity of finishes throughout. Nicely accessorized with side-mounted spares with mirrors, driving lights, stone guard, and a trunk, the Imperial remains cosmetically well-preserved after many years on display in the present owners’ collection.

This would be an ideal choice for the enthusiast seeking the open-air flair of the CG Imperial Dual-Cowl Phaeton, as fine an open touring car as was ever produced in the Classic Era.