Lot 174

2014 Lamborghini Gallardo LP 570-4 Squadra Corse

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€200,000 - €225,000 EUR | Not Sold

Monaco | Monte Carlo, Monaco

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Chassis No.
ZHWGE7AJ8ELA13711
Documents
German Fahrzeugbrief
  • The final and most desirable edition of Lamborghini’s game-changing Gallardo
  • One of just 50 limited-edition examples ever built
  • 562-horsepower 5.2-litre V-10 engine mated to a six-speed “e-gear” automatic transmission
  • Odometer reads just 5,935 km at time of cataloguing
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Following the company’s takeover by Volkswagen in 1998, Lamborghini’s stock was on the rise in the early 2000s. The Diablo had been restyled to great effect, and the firm’s first model to be created entirely under the guidance of Audi—the Murcielago—proved to be a runaway success. But even the flagship model came close to being overshadowed by the upstart Gallardo, a V-10-powered, mid-engined, rear-wheel drive, entry-level junior supercar that would serve as a gateway drug for the Sant’Agata faithful for a full decade.

More than 14,000 Gallardos were built during the model’s 10-year production run, making it one of the most successful Lamborghini models of all time. Throughout that period the car was gradually improved, marked by the launch of a second generation in 2008, headlined by an all-new uneven firing 5.2-litre V-10 engine. Dozens of limited-edition models followed, few as special as the LP 570-4 Squadra Corse, a run of just 50 road-legal machines built in the mould of the Super Trofeo circuit racer.

This hardcore machine differs from the standard Gallardo in a number of key areas, notably aerodynamics, with modified front and rear bumpers, a rear wing—said to generate three-times the downforce of the standard spoiler—and a removeable quick-release engine cover. At its heart lies a 562-horsepower version of the 5.2-litre V-10 engine mated to a six-speed “e-gear” automatic transmission, capable of propelling the Gallardo to a top speed of 199 mph, with stopping via powerful four-wheel carbon-ceramic disc brakes.

Finished in Grigio Thalasso over a red-and-black Bicolore Squadra Corse interior, this Gallardo was first delivered to Lamborghini Düsseldorf in 2014, benefitting from several choice options including a system to electronically lift the front spoiler, satellite navigation, red interior stitching, and eye-catching rosso brake calipers. The car covered around 5,300 km in its first four years before being bought by the vendor, who has used it sparingly since. The accompanying service book has been stamped in 2015 (3,411 km), 2016 (4,774 km), 2018 (5,220km), 2019 (5,510 km), and 2021 (5,710 km), while at time of cataloguing the odometer reads 5,935 km.

The Squadra Corse represents the end of an era for Lamborghini—a final fling before its entry-level supercar stepped into retirement. Already an incredible machine, in the Squadra Corse the Gallardo achieved its full potential, with the run-out model representing the most purposeful and most powerful variant of the hit modern classic.