Lot 200

1933 Ford Tudor Sedan

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$24,200 USD | Sold

United States | Hershey, Pennsylvania

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Chassis No.
40424533
Documents
US Title
  • An older restoration that still presents beautifully
  • Powered by the iconic Ford flathead V-8
  • An ideal touring car for Antique Automobile Club of America (AACA) events

Ford introduced the Model A as a replacement for its long-running Model T in 1928, but just four years later, the iconic Model A itself was history. To upstage rival Chevrolet’s six-cylinder, Ford offered its first V-8 engine in 1932. Though V-8s were nothing new, this was the first time one was to be offered in a low-price, mass-produced car.

Introduced 9 February 1933, the stylish 1933 Fords took streamlining to a new level, with bodies that were longer and wider with updated grilles, angled hood louvers, and curvaceous chromed center-dip bumpers. The cast- iron flathead V-8 engine was a tremendous value for the money, offering 75 horsepower from its 221 cubic-inch displacement. The V-8 engine, greatly improved from the previous year’s offerings with higher compression, aluminum heads, and a stronger ignition system, proved highly popular. Ford discontinued its four-cylinder engine in March of the 1934 model year, and the V-8, which would come to be known as simply the “Flathead,” would serve as the basis for many Ford products, and many hot rods, for years to come.

For 1933, 15 different V-8 body styles and specifications were offered, including a Standard Tudor and a Deluxe specification. At $500 and $550 respectively, more than 154,000 Tudors found owners that year, showing that Ford president Edsel Ford had a true winner on his hands.

The 1933 Ford Tudor offered here is an older restoration that still presents beautifully and is said to be a highly capable touring machine. From its beautifully shiny, deep paint with contrasting pinstriping to the iconic wide whitewall tires mounted on bright red 17-inch wire wheels, this Tudor is sure to turn heads and garner attention anywhere it goes. One of the early Fords most often seen as a hot rod, this example has been maintained in original specification and would be an ideal choice for touring with the American Automobile Club of America (AACA) or the Early Ford V-8 Club of America.