Lot 198

1942 Packard Eight Convertible Coupe

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$60,000 - $70,000 USD 

United States | Hershey, Pennsylvania

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Inquire

1599-2972
Vehicle No.
Documents
US Title
To be offered on Wednesday, 5 October 2022
  • One of just 972 Eight Convertible Coupes built for 1942
  • Fully restored to a high level
  • Powered by a 282-cubic-inch, inline, eight-cylinder engine with a synchromesh, three-speed, manual transmission
  • Fitted with highly desirable options, including dual spotlights and clock
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After helping to save the Depression-stricken Packard Motor Company from near-oblivion during the mid-1930s, the One-Twenty series came to an end in 1941. For 1942, Packard began to introduce the “Clipper” nomenclature and styling for its “Junior” series cars, which retained their predecessor’s 120-inch wheelbase. Of all the Twentieth Series Junior cars, only the Convertible Coupe body style of the newly christened Six (model number 1589) and Eight (1599) retained the classic pre-war Packard styling. Among the most desirable of these final pre-war Packards, the Eight Convertible Coupe sold for $1,578, making it the most expensive of the Junior series cars offered for 1942.

The example offered here is truly spectacular, with its classically styled convertible body wearing appropriately classic black paint over an incredibly beautiful oxblood leather interior. Powered by Packard’s familiar 282-cubic-inch, inline, eight-cylinder engine backed by a synchromesh, three-speed, manual transmission, and reined in with four-wheel hydraulic brakes, the car is as capable as it is beautiful. Fitted with the iconic “Goddess of Speed” radiator mascot, radio, and optional clock, it is also well appointed and highly luxurious. From the dual side-mounted spares and wide whitewall tires with factory wheel covers to the optional dual spotlights, this Eight Convertible Coupe wears many of the classic details that made Packard a standout in the luxury car market.

Research recently released by noted Packard historian Dr. Charles Blackman shows that just 972 of these incredible Eight Convertible Coupes were built by Packard for 1942. No matter the rarity, a fine example of a properly fettled pre-war car is sure to bring countless smiles to the faces of those lucky enough to own one. When the car in question is a beautiful convertible Packard, those smiles are sure to multiply. This example is particularly striking, presented in highly attractive colors, and fitted with a nice selection of optional equipment. Said to have been regularly enjoyed and properly maintained, the car appears to be a fantastic touring example. It is an ideal choice for touring or showing with organizations such as the Antique Automobile Club of America or either of the recognized Packard clubs.