Lot 183

1935 Cadillac V-8 Convertible Coupe by Fisher

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$92,400 USD | Sold

United States | Amelia Island, Florida

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Engine No.
3106675
Body No.
27
Documents
US Title
  • Believed to feature the original factory paint and interior
  • Dealer show car displayed at the 1935 General Motors Spring Show in New York City
  • Preservation Class-winner at the 2012 Palos Verdes Concours d’Elegance; said to have been mechanically restored by the early 2010s
  • Documented with copies of the factory build sheet and 2013–2017 service invoices
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Please note the title for this particular lot is in transit and, in light of current world events and limited government office hours and closings, may be considerably delayed in reaching the successful buyer. It is expected that the delay could be up to six to eight weeks or more. Please speak with an RM representative for further details.

Introduced in January 1935, the new Cadillacs featured all-steel turret-tops on the Fisher-bodied V-8 powered Model 355-E, which was offered in two different series. The Series 10 rode the shorter 128-inch wheelbase and was available in six different body styles, including the sporty two-door Convertible Coupe. The Series 10 epitomized Cadillac’s contemporary aeronautic design motif of perpetual motion at rest, with a raked grille and windshield contributing to a streamlined effect.

According to a factory build sheet on file, this 355-E was ordered by the John D. Wendell Cadillac dealership in Albany, New York, for display at the General Motors Spring Show staged in April 1935 at the Hotel Astor in New York City. Ordered just three days before the show began, the Cadillac was finished in black paint with a tan top, and optioned with a Goddess radiator mascot, side-mounted spare wheels, a wire-spoked “flexible” steering wheel, twin license plate frames, and black metal disc covers for the wire wheels. As suggested by inspection stickers that are still affixed to the windshield, the car remained in the New York area as late as 1988.

By the early 2010s the Cadillac had passed into the care of Glenn Streeter, a collector residing in Rancho Palos Verdes, California. Mr. Streeter is believed to have commissioned a full mechanical restoration by the late Ernie Foster of Torrance, California, who reportedly rebuilt the engine and shock absorbers, and installed a new wiring harness and gas tank.

On the strength of its paintwork and interior, the car won the Best Preservation Award at the 2012 Palos Verdes Concours d’Elegance. Invoices on file reflect that Mr. Streeter conducted further mechanical freshening over the ensuing five years, including a rebuild of the thermostat, installation of a new-old-stock timing chain, and attention to the transmission, carburetor, and choke enricher valve.

The 355-E has continued to enjoy a life of controlled storage in recent years, helping to preserve what is believed to be its original factory paint and interior. The Convertible Coupe would make an ideal participant at meets of the AACA and the CCCA, the latter of which defines the model as a Full Classic. Also suited for preservation-class competition, or display at marque-themed events, this authentic Series 10 attests to the luxurious “standard of excellence” that Cadillac achieved in the 1930s.