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Arizona | Lot 175

1949 Chrysler Town and Country Convertible

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$58,240 USD | Sold

United States | Phoenix, Arizona

18 January 2018


Chassis No.
Body No.
7410805
1807
  • One of 1,000 Town and Country convertibles produced for 1949
  • Prestomatic Fluid Drive Transmission
  • First automobile to use an ergonomically designed instrument panel and key tumbler ignition
Please note that this title is in transit.
Addendum: Please note that this title is in transit.

The year 1949 marked Chrysler’s 25th anniversary. The firm introduced its all-new post-war models in March of that year. Included was an equally new Town and Country model that now featured an all-steel structure. This was the first “T&C” that did not include the white ash framing as part of the structure of the car. Chrysler claimed greater safety, durability, and ease of maintenance. Gone was the four-door sedan. Two models were offered – the convertible and a new hardtop two-door coupe – though none of the latter were ever produced. Just 1,000 convertible models were completed by year’s end. Initially, Di-Noc mahogany panels accented the white ash framing, but during the model run they were eliminated and the inset panels were now painted the same color as the body.

Inside, Town and Country convertibles received a padded dash and instruments were clustered in front of the driver around the steering column. Controls were in easy reach and instruments were clearly legible. Later, this would be common among all automobiles. This was also the first vehicle to use a key tumbler that the driver would turn in order to start the car. Other standard features included a waterproof ignition system, cigar lighter, electric clock, Prestomatic fluid drive transmission, and two-speed electric wipers. Power was supplied by a 135-hp L-head 323.5-cu. in. Spitfire straight eight.

Finished in Ensign Blue with a taupe canvas top and proper blue leather, this Town and Country has been stored in a climate-controlled facility while in the possession of the consignor. It was meant to be used and enjoyed by the consignor, and will offer the same pleasure to its new owner, as it has been serviced and is ready to tour.

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